Life would have you expand, fear would have you contract

Fear is so deeply and widely felt throughout humanity. Its effects can be strong or subtle, we can either be aware of it or it can sneak up on us so we don’t even realise it is fear that might be holding us back from doing something.

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Nature and Mental Wellbeing

One of the recent classes in the Holistic Mental Wellbeing Course was on nature and mental wellbeing. We had great fun doing the class under a big tree at the Hamilton Gardens!

The relationship between nature and mental health was first written about decades ago, and has been steadily gaining ground in the past few years in wellbeing research.

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Mindfulness: Does it Hurt?

Many of you who are on a path to mental wellbeing or living your best life will have heard of or started practicing mindfulness. There is a whole lot of research about the positive effects of the practice, for example: anxiety, stress, and anger reduction, reduced relapse in recurrent depression, increased empathy, self-compassion, and satisfaction with life (see Keng, Smoski, and Robins, 2011, for a good review).
You could be forgiven for thinking that practicing mindfulness only comes with feelings of peace and serenity. Maybe you have believed that if these feelings don’t come up when you try to meditate, you must be doing it wrong. That is not so. Mindfulness can be a painful experience at times.

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Spirituality and Mental Wellbeing - Finding Your Path

Spirituality and mental health are not often mentioned in the same sentence, however for many people their spiritual wellbeing is intricately connected to their mental wellbeing. When you consider that spirituality is in part the way you make sense of your life and existence in the universe, it cannot help but be related to your mental and emotional health. 

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Stress and Nutrition

Do you live with chronic stress?

Ongoing stress has become something many of us live with as we try to find a balance between work, relationships, rest, interests and recreation. As we look to improve our health and happiness, it is no wonder that a key focus is to take a look at this balance, and see where we can reduce our stress. We might try prioritising our demands and saying “no” more often; bringing a meditation practice into our everyday life; or getting a good sleep routine going.
Despite our best efforts though, sometimes we experience events that are out of our control and result in trauma or heightened stress over a long period of time.

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